News Flash for Radiologic Technologists!

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Big Changes are Big News

Blog by Lesa Mohr, BS, RT(R)(BD)(QM), AHEC Faculty

Keeping you updated on the latest changes that affect the way you maintain your license and credentials:

Homestudy  Changes

  • The required number of test questions per CE credit for homestudies has been reduced . You will find AHEC has already and is implementing these changes. (This is great)
  • You may now take the same CE homestudy over again in a subsequent biennium. This requires a new certificate, of course. Do you have a favorite? Check to see if it’s still approved and you can refresh your skills.

Advanced Level Exam Changes

  • Jan 1, 2016: You need 16 hours of structured education that pertains to the discipline prior to applying for the exam (Category A or A+)
  • Jan 1, 2018: those 16 hours must cover at least 1 hour of each major category of exam content
  • AHEC is providing these courses in live events and also through simulcast to your home or office via your computer. Register now for June, 2016 class.

News for CT Technologists

  • Joint Commission requires diagnostic CT technologist to hold advanced CT certification from ARRT or NMTCB, or hold:
    • A state license permitting CT exams & documented CT exam training
    • An ARRT registration & certification in radiography & documented CT exam training
    • An ARRT (N) or NMTCB certification & documented CT exam training
  • BY Jan 1, 2018 all CT technologists must have documented training preparing them for the advanced level exam
  • The new term is you must be “registry ready” is permeating the industry and is found in all job descriptions.

Bang Head Here!

So here I sit on New Year’s Eve contemplating this year of 2014.  I will not be sad to leave it behind and as the eternal optimist I look forward to a better year in 2015.  It’s a surprise that we can get up every morning if we listen to the media. So much hate, so much violence, so much war, so much obesity, so much politics, so much sadness, so much disaster, so much of everything. How do we survive it all?bang head here

I have never been one to make many New Year’s resolutions. I don’t think waiting until New Year’s to decide to be a better person or any other infamous decisions is the right thing to do. If you are giving up your addictions, why wait? My addictions just continue anyway. That is why they are addictions, I have trouble giving them up and I don’t think you can use the word “addiction” and “healthy” in the same sentence.

I read and I hear that the country has turned the corner and that unemployment is decreasing. I also read and hear that inflation is under control? Has anyone bought bread and milk lately? Everything is going up and now gasoline is hitting the bottom.  I don’t think we have to worry about the major oil companies being “too big to go broke” like the banks were in 2008. They should have plenty of financial cushions from the prices we have been paying at the pump for the last few years. But, it the pundits are correct and our friends in the Middle East are doing this to lower the competition, something will surely “pop”.

I am surrounded by news that is not very comforting. I ignore it some days, and other days it affects my life as it does yours.  Tomorrow, I will choose to ignore it and enjoy my New Year’s parade and some football.  And maybe make a New Year’s resolution.

AARP Bulletin Advises Members Against Medical Tests

active seniors

I wonder how many patients Elizabeth Agnvall has sent to an early grave today? The latest AARP Bulletin screams the headline- Doctors say: Skip These Tests! “Doctors warn that some of the common medical tests routinely taken by Americans do more harm than good, waste billions of dollars and could endanger your health or even your life…” Are you kidding me?

On page 12 she lists yearly EKG’s, PSA for prostate cancer, yearly medical exams, annual PAP smears, bone density scans before age 65, colonoscopy after age 75 and etc. She puts forth the premise that prostate cancer is slow growing and you would die from something else first. Where did she get her information? Most people will not read the quantifications she puts in her article and will just read the sensationalist headlines. I can just hear it now “But, AARP says I don’t need to do that test now. It’s more harmful than helpful.” Yes, my mother’s voice still plays in my head. My mother got most of her medical information and diagnosis from Readers Digest. 

The author of the article did leave out the mammogram controversy and for that I am grateful. At least maybe that will not be affected. However, you need a yearly visit to get your order for the test.  Most people don’t need an excuse to NOT see the doctor. My family has lost 3 young individuals to cancer in the last 18 months because they didn’t see the doctor and ignored the symptoms. it is totally irresponsible for AARP to support such a premise. Are we all falling into the theory, becoming more and more prevalent, that if you are over the age of 70 you should be given the boot and make way for those that are younger.  More people than ever are living longer and having good quality of life. Technology is providing more and more answers and the average age of our population is moving forward (or is that upward?). Others believe this is a ploy and supported by the insurance companies to lower their costs and increase the profits. I do know that we will have a reckoning in this country when we believe that we can pay for everything that is wrong with the health of this nation with taxpayers dollars. Certainly there are some unnecessary medical tests being ordered and performed. Some physicians are more guilty than others. I heard one physician describe it as a bowl of Jello. You couldn’t get your arms around it. But, advising patients to stay away from the very tests and visits that could save their life is not the right way.